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Evolution of Media Relations: Real-time Formalities & SEO [Inbound Report]

Inbound Marketing Industry ReportInbound Marketing Industry Report, highlighting top articles and news stories from the first week of November, 2012.

Hurricane Sandy Sweeps Across the East ... And the Interwebs

Here’s to hoping we’ve seen the worst of this wild weather for a while. In addition to chaos along the coast, Hurricane Sandy also prompted a slew of articles that help drive home some important tips for those operating in the real-time news environment. 

  1. Did you follow storm updates through social media? I know I did; with many of my family members, friends and fellow co-workers affected, I stayed in touch out West via Facebook and Twitter. Augie Ray (@augieray) reminds us how social communications can help in a crisis.
  2. Relatedly, Mitch Joel (@mitchjoel) touches on how easily technology enables information to be free and shareable, or locked down and private. Hurricane Sandy left newspapers like the Wall Street Journal and New York Times situation in a unique situation, taking down their paywalls, and, in a sense, “newsjacking their own content in an attempt to build brand loyalty and a larger user base.”
  3. Newsjacking—incorporating your own ideas into news stories to generate media attention—comes with some serious power. But, to ensure the buzz you receive is positive, newsjack in good taste. David Meerman Scott (@dmscott) sparks a very important conversation about how newsjacking in poor form can hinder—rather than help—your brand. The takeaway? Whether it’s creating content or pitching a reporter, Marketers need to act in real time, but also be cognizant of timing, and how actions may come across when tied to sensitive issues.

Media Relations Goes Meta

Have you ever wondered what it takes to get a link on a major site like Mashable? To determine what type of content would be best for her to submit for consideration on the site, Kate Morris (@katemorris) conducted an in-depth content analysis to nail down content that Mashable covers. Included are types of posts, frequency and engagement, and more importantly, the tools and logic used to extract and interpret the data.

This thorough analysis is an interesting, intensely data-driven approach to media relations—a far cry from the standard pitching approach of the past. Even if you don’t recreate such an analysis for your own program, remember this key takeaway: Media relations is no longer just about the pitch, the product or the relationship. To ensure you’re focusing on opportunities with the greatest potential for return, approach your pitching process with an understanding of how PR, SEO and content come together to achieve success—both for your organization and the target publication. (See: How to Use Content to Propel Public Relations)

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